Special Halloween FREE BOOK promotions!

Special Halloween promotions!
Two of my novels will be available FREE from midday on the 31st October, throughout the Halloween weekend and into next week. If you haven’t read them yet, now is the time to download these treats to read on cold winter nights by the fireside.

Belle-1a

The first FREE offer is, ‘Belle’ and her story will warm your heart.

The first in my romantic, three book saga, Women of Verdun. Follow her story of hope, heartache and suspense as she battles to save her family and keep them safe.

Available here at Amazom UK:-http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00YQ4CTY6

Available here at Amazon US:- http://amzn.com/B00YQ4CTY6

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The second FREE offer is, ‘The Truth Revealed’ and this story will chill your soul.

This is the first in my two book series about alien abduction, They Take our Children. Immerse yourself in the lives of an ordinary Yorkshire family caught up in an incredible tale of secrets, intrigue and horror.

Available here at Amazon UK:- http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00GF3M4RI

Available here at Amazon US:- http://amzn.com/B00GF3M4RI

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FREE sci-fi ebook, They Take our Children, Book One, The truth Revealed.

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To tempt my loyal romance readers to try a different genre, I’m offering one of my Sci-fi titles Free from 6th to 10th April in all Amazon stores.

I began to serialise this novel here in my blog, but decided I couldn’t put the whole book up as that would breach my conditions of publishing with Amazon, and staying exclusive to them.

Book one of the two part sci-fi series, They Take our Children, The Truth Revealed is a story of alien abduction, but involves real people from a normal family who experience some exraordinary events.

Try it, what have you got to lose? If you are tempted, please let me know what you think.

Excerpt No 13, ‘They Take our Children, Book One, The Truth Revealed.’

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PROLOGUE
I became interested in UFOs a few years ago after seeing strange flying objects in the sky above my home town of Wakefield, West Yorkshire. I discussed my sightings with a police officer friend, and he warned me that I would not be taken seriously if I reported it to the authorities. I was astonished when he also confided in me that he had been abducted by aliens, but was too afraid to talk openly of his experience.

I decided to do some research on the issue. I talked with more abductees, attended UFO conferences, read many books on the subject and trawled the Internet for more information. I was surprised how much I found. I had no idea where my investigations would lead, but I was totally unprepared for what I uncovered.
Sifting the genuine stories from the fake accounts was challenging. Unfortunately, this subject is often trivialised and ridiculed, and I know that some will believe ALL the accounts are phony, no matter how much compelling testimony and physical evidence can be found.

I was drawn to a series of accounts that followed the same theme. Balls of light were seen in the sky, followed by abduction to a strange place, where physical examinations were made on the abductees by alien beings. Some abductees mention a breeding programme of some kind between aliens and human beings. How can so many similar stories, from individuals around the world, be false?

The idea of a book began to take shape. I wanted to expose the facts that I had discovered, but my police officer friend had warned me that nobody would listen. So I wrote a fictional account, using details from my research. You can read the serialised excerpts from the story here.
Fact or fiction?
Urban myth or government cover-up?
You decide.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This 13th excerpt is from a science fiction novel about alien abduction. If you would like to read the novel from the beginning, please see the previous excerpts in, ‘They Take our Children.’

The complete eBook series is available on Amazon stores worldwide priced at $0.99 US dollars or equivalent, or £0.99p in UK.

Please go to an Amazon online store to purchase this novel if you can’t wait to read the rest.

Amazon.com

Amazon.co.uk

 

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Chapter Thirteen: Courtney

Courtney was not surprised by the enthusiasm of her welcome home. She expected her father and grandparents to fuss over her. She did not expect the fierce hug she received from her mother and was shocked by the unexpected display of emotion.

‘I’m so sorry, Courtney, I’m really so very sorry.’ Helen’s voice cracked with emotion as she put her arms around Courtney and squeezed her tightly.

Courtney allowed the embrace, but held herself stiffly. This unexpected show of affection was out of character and to Courtney it seemed false. It would take more than a hug and a few tears to put right the wrongs of a lifetime. She saw the astonishment on the faces of the rest of the family and knew that she wasn’t the only one to be surprised by her mother’s actions.

Helen glanced nervously at her husband who smiled encouragingly. The awkward silence that followed was soon filled by a horde of questions. Each member of the family had something they wanted to ask Courtney. Where had she been? How come the police didn’t find her in the hut in the woods? Courtney explained that the hut was so overgrown, that it took her a few hours to find it. She spent the two nights there, venturing to the local all-night shop when she felt hungry for sandwiches and bottled water. When she ran out of money, she left the shelter and once she had walked out of the woods, it seemed foolish to stay away from home any longer. She had no money, no change of clothes, no food and nowhere else to go.

‘Tell me, Courtney,’ her grandfather asked. ‘If you had the means to support yourself, would you have come home?’

Courtney glanced around the room at the faces full of expectant hope. She looked at her feet, avoiding their eyes as she shook her head. ‘I didn’t want to face you all. I didn’t want to see Mum again.’

All eyes turned to Helen, who also studied the floor, but she took a deep breath and lifted her eyes to face her daughter.

‘I can understand why you feel like that, Courtney. I don’t blame you. I should never have said what I did. I’m truly sorry you heard me.’ She spoke with humility, her voice wavering.

Gavin reached for his wife’s hand, raising his eyebrows at Courtney, giving her a small nod of encouragement, his eyes pleading with her to accept the apology. Courtney closed her eyes, shutting out the sight of her father showing his approval of her mother. He always found excuses for her mother’s behaviour. He always found reasons for her lack of understanding, lack of time and lack of interest. Her father had always been patient with her mother, explaining her eccentricities, filling the void in Courtney’s life himself while her mother absented herself.

All the pain of abandonment was symbolised in that one gesture of her father holding her mother’s hand, while she, Courtney, was the one who had been hurt. The resentment she felt towards her mother spread to include her father and the two days away from them had not diminished the pain but had fuelled it. She filled the long hours in the hut with memories.  She dredged up all the incidents she could recall, all the times her mother had let her down and all the times her father had condoned her mother’s actions. Courtney saw both her parents in a different light and she didn’t like what she saw. She knew she should, for the sake of peace, accept the offered apology but that would not help her to understand why her mother treated her so badly and she so desperately wanted to know why.

‘Courtney,’ George intervened. ‘I think your mum deserves some kind of response from you, she’s told you how sorry she is. Let’s just accept the apology and put all this behind us.’

‘I’m sorry too, Pops,’ she turned glistening eyes to her grandfather. ‘But I can’t forgive and I can’t forget.’ She nodded at her mother. ‘She called me a monster. What am I supposed to think? What did you mean, Mother? What have I ever done to make you hate me so much?’

Helen crumbled, the words struck her like arrows and each seemed to find its way to her heart. Tears ran down her cheeks as she continued to stare at her daughter.

Undeterred, Courtney continued her verbal attack. She was blind to her mother’s suffering. She’d had two whole days and nights to remember every hurtful memory of the pain and the rejection she had felt throughout her life. Each opened wound added venom to her voice.

‘You were never there for me. I can’t even remember one time when you put your arms around me. Do you realise, Mother, just now was the first time I can remember that you ever held me? Most mothers are proud of their children when they achieve good marks at school. You came to my prize-giving evenings but only because Dad made you. You never even smiled when I got up to receive my prizes. I didn’t get a word of congratulations. Do you know how much you hurt me?

Every time I tried to please you, you ignored me. Why don’t you love me, Mother? Why have you always ignored me? Why does everyone stick up for you and treat you as if you were some special china doll, while I’m expected to accept the hurt time after time? Why? Why! Tell me what I’ve done!’ Courtney’s whole body leaned towards her mother, yearning desperately for some kind of explanation. She would have continued but Gavin interrupted.

‘Courtney, don’t do this.’ Gavin tried to stem the flow of words. ‘Can’t you see what you’re doing to your mother? Don’t you know how fragile her health is?’

‘I think we should let her finish, she has a lot to get off her chest.’ Janine, sitting next to Courtney on the sofa, put her arm around her niece. ‘Go on, Courtney, let it all out, you’ll feel better for it and so will your mum, eventually.’

Courtney watched her mother flinch, but knew that her auntie was right. It was time her mother faced the consequences of her uncaring attitude. She glanced at the faces of the rest of the family for some sign of encouragement to continue but all she saw were worry lines on the faces of her grandparents and father. Terry looked embarrassed, Janine was angry, her lips compressed and shoulders hunched.

Courtney now felt deflated by the interruption, her words had been harsh and she had planned even harsher ones while rehearsing her speech in isolation. Now the words in her mind were a jumble of disconnected incidents and it seemed petty and childish to list them out loud. Her mother sat quietly sobbing into her dad’s shoulder, it wasn’t how she expected her mother would react and it unsettled Courtney to see her mum so upset. Even after all she’d done and all she’d left undone, Courtney still had some feelings for her mother.

‘I’ve finished.’ Courtney hung her head. She really did not want to be the cause of so much distress. She wanted everything to be all right again and remembered her grandmother’s words, so often said in troubled times, least said, soonest mended. Courtney decided she’d said enough.

Helen continued to weep quietly in Gavin’s arms, Janine held Courtney close.  Terry, Mary and George sat in silence, until Mary went to put the kettle on.

‘Let’s all have a nice cup of tea, thing’s will look better in the morning.’ Mary said brightly, though it was still early evening.

‘Gavin,’ George coughed to clear his throat, ‘I think it might be a good time for us all to look at that suitcase again, don’t you?’

Helen looked at her father with a puzzled expression then looked at Gavin.

‘Your father showed me your case notes yesterday, from when you were ill.’ Gavin explained.

‘What case notes?’ Helen looked at her father.

Courtney sat up, interested in what her grandfather had to show them. She didn’t notice Janine shrinking back into the sofa, or Terry moving quickly to her auntie’s side.

‘Dad, what have you been up to?’ Helen’s face drained of colour and her eyes looked dark and afraid.

‘I knew one day that someone would want to know what happened to you. I didn’t know until a few years ago that it would be our Courtney.’ George looked at his granddaughter, the wonder and interest showed clearly in her face.

Courtney was intrigued. Whatever happened to her mother, it must have something to do with herself. She became afraid, thinking maybe she could become ill. Was there a secret hereditary illness in the family? She looked at her mother, seeing fear in her face but also a strange acceptance in the set of her shoulders. Courtney held her breath, waiting for the next words from her grandfather.

‘Perhaps you could tell Courtney about the lights, Janine,’ he said.

‘The lights?’ Janine asked, shakily, as colour drained from her face.

‘You remember the Christmas lights?’ George persisted. ‘It was all over the newspapers and the television. Don’t you remember your friends being interviewed on the television after our New Year’s Eve party?’

‘They were Helen’s friends, not mine.’ Janine said defensively. ‘They were so full of themselves; you’d have thought they’d been the only ones to see anything.’

‘Did you see Jodie Robson?’ Helen joined in. ‘She even put makeup on for the cameras, she looked like a clown!’

Courtney listened, fascinated by the conversation, intrigued by the closeness between her mother and auntie as they discussed their past, a closeness that had never been apparent to her until now. They shared a past that Courtney was only vaguely aware of. She’d never really thought about them growing up together, never thought of them as children. As they discussed the shared memories, Courtney watched their faces closely, seeing them as if for the first time, as people. She saw a different dimension to the two women she thought she knew so well.

The light-hearted banter about their friends diminished as George steered the conversation round to the night the lights appeared. Both women became reluctant to speak about them. Gavin took over, describing to Courtney and Terry what he had seen on the television screen at George’s home.

‘I’m sure there must be some logical explanation but I don’t know what it could be.’ Gavin finished.

‘We could go get the suitcase, everyone could watch it, then you’ll see for yourselves.’ George struggled to his feet, obviously intending to go fetch the evidence.

Mary had been listening at the door for some time and blocked her husband’s exit.

‘What’s all this!’ She squared up to him. ‘I said you weren’t to mention that suitcase. There’s been enough upset these past few days, without bringing all that rubbish here.’

‘It is not rubbish, woman!’ George made to push her gently out of his way, but she held her ground.

‘Just what do you hope to achieve with all this, George?’ Mary asked, shaking her head, her eyes looking troubled.

‘Look around you, woman!’ George said, exasperated. ‘Just you look at them all.’ He waved his arm around, indicating the gathered family. Terry sat with a protective arm around a frightened Janine. Gavin supported Helen and Courtney watched her grandparents with curiosity.

‘Our Helen is and always has been, an emotional wreck,’ George continued. ‘She’s blundered her way through life with all of us making allowances for her. You all think she’s a poor weak, delicate thing. The truth is that she’s much stronger than all of us put together. I don’t know that any one of us could have gone through what that girl did and stay sane.’

Helen looked astonished at her father’s outburst.

‘You heard those tapes, Mary. Can you honestly tell me you believe it was all her imagination?’ George asked, looking deep into his wife’s eyes.

‘But it isn’t true, you know it can’t be.’ Mary looked uncertain as she glanced at Helen.

‘It was the truth, Mum.’ Helen’s small voice cut through the tension in the room and all eyes turned to her. ‘Everything on those tapes happened.’ She turned to her sister, shaking her head, leaning back against Gavin’s shoulder. ‘I’m sorry, Janine, but it happened to you too.’

Janine sank further back into the sofa and Terry’s arm tightened around her. She shook her head vigorously. ‘No! No! You’re wrong! Nothing happened to me! Do you hear me! Nothing happened!’ Janine sobbed. ‘You were the one who was ill! I had a nightmare. I don’t even remember it now.’

‘Just because you don’t remember, doesn’t mean it didn’t happen.’ George spoke softly, forcing them to quiet down to hear his soft voice. ‘Helen was so ill because she did remember. We could have put you through therapy, Janine. It was suggested at the time, especially as Helen insisted them things took you too. But it was kinder to leave you as you were. You seemed happy enough, you quickly got over it all and it seemed cruel to make you remember it. One disturbed daughter was bad enough.’

‘Where were they taken?’ Terry’s interest was clearly awakened at the words George used. ‘Our sons were taken by someone, is there some connection?’

‘The lights took us.’ Helen told Terry. ‘I don’t know if they took Chris and Sam, but I believe they did.’ She stared at Janine shaking her head as if to deny what Helen was saying. ‘Janine believes that too, but she won’t admit it. Not even to herself.’

‘It’s true, Terry.’ George kept his voice low, watching Janine’s face crumple.

‘No. Please no. Not our boys.’ Janine whispered, covering her face.

Courtney, could not understand what the adults were talking about and became more confused. Now the secret seemed to involve the whole family and judging by the reactions, it was a terrible secret. Now she wasn’t sure she wanted to hear about it. Janine and Terry were visibly shaking. Somehow their sons were linked to this secret. Her two cousins went missing before she was born. So it seemed the boys, who would by now be adults, were also involved in this mystery. Where were they? Who had taken them? What had happened to her cousins?

‘Who took our boys, George?’ Terry asked, struggling to contain his anger. ‘You’ve known all this time and said nothing!’ He jumped from the sofa and moved closer to his father-in-law. ‘Where are my sons?’ he demanded.

George backed away, holding his hands defensively in front of him. ‘I don’t know, Terry lad, none of us does.’

‘Calm down, Terry, it’s not Dad’s fault.’ Janine went to her husband, putting her arms around him. ‘No one could have stopped them. They only took back what was theirs.’ Tears rolled down her face as she looked at him, then she turned to Helen. ‘I always knew,’ she sobbed. ‘I thought if I didn’t think about it, it wouldn’t happen.’ She put her shaking fingers to her mouth. ‘You tried to make me remember, to make me look into the blackness,’ she sniffed, ‘but it was more than I could face.’ She hid her tear filled face against Terry’s shirt. He pulled her closer, stroking her back, turning his questioning face to Helen.

‘I’m sorry, Terry,’ Helen began. ‘There’s no easy way to tell you what happened to Chris and Sam.’

‘Are they dead? Do you know that much? If they are, just tell me.’ Terry asked, obviously afraid of hearing the answer, but clearly needing to know.

‘I believe they are alive.’ Helen said carefully and Terry closed his eyes and mouthed a silent, ‘thank God.’

‘I have no idea where they are, but I know who took them and I know why they took them.’ Helen glanced at her daughter, knowing her next words would shock them all. ‘I also know that they will want to take Courtney. One day they will come for her like they came for Sam and Chris.’

Courtney stared at her mother open-mouthed. This was so unreal. She looked to her father for a denial of her mother’s words, then to her grandfather. Their faces remained unreadable, but there was no denial from any of them, they believed her mother. Even Janine was sobbing harder, not even looking at her. Her grandmother stared steadfastly out of the window, seemingly trying to detach herself from the scene.

Terry came to her rescue, leaving the sobbing Janine by the window with her mother. He came to sit by Courtney and took her hand.

‘I won’t let anyone take you away from us, Courtney,’ he promised her. ‘Do you hear me?’ He turned to the rest of the family. ‘Whoever is responsible for taking my sons will not get the chance to take our Courtney.’ He pulled her into his embrace, as if his love alone would protect her.

‘You can’t stop them, Terry. You don’t know how strong they are.’ Helen’s face was pained, seeing the frightened reaction of Courtney. ‘You don’t have to fear them, Courtney, they won’t harm you.’

‘How do you know that?’ Terry asked.

‘I know.’ Helen’s face was filled with what looked like compassion.

‘Mum, you’re frightening me. Who wants to take me? Where, why, what’s it all about?’ Courtney looked from her mother to her Auntie Janine. Both women were obviously afraid of something.

Janine went to Helen and putting a hand on her sister’s shoulder, she looked at Courtney. ‘Your mum is the bravest person I know, Courtney. Now I’m going to try to be as brave as she has been. I don’t remember things like you, Helen,’ she paused and took a deep breath, ‘but I will help to back you up if I can.’ She turned to Courtney. ‘We need to tell you some things and you’re going to be shocked but you have to be brave too.’ Janine squeezed Helen’s shoulder. ‘I still don’t remember much about the lights, or about where we were taken. I remember feeling frightened but I don’t remember why.’

‘You’re lucky you don’t remember, Janine, if what Helen told me this morning is true.’ Gavin’s eyes were full of compassion. ‘I do believe you, Helen. I don’t understand, but I believe.’

‘Do you want to hear the rest?’ Helen asked Gavin.

‘I do, Mum,’ Courtney answered. ‘By the sound of it, I’m involved aren’t I?’

‘More than any one else in this room,’ George told her. ‘But we’ll get to that later.’

Courtney watched her grandfather take a seat at the table. He looked almost smug. She wondered how much he knew about the mystery. She wondered what she had started by running away. What can of worms was opening up because of what she heard her mother say about her? She couldn’t wait to find out.

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TO BE CONTINUED.………..

This 13th excerpt is from a science fiction novel about alien abduction. If you would like to read the novel from the beginning, please see the previous excerpts in, ‘They Take our Children.’

The complete eBook series is available on Amazon stores worldwide. Please go to an Amazon online store to purchase this novel if you can’t wait to read the rest.

Amazon.com

Amazon.co.uk

Excerpt No 12, ‘They Take our Children, Book One, The Truth Revealed.’

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PROLOGUE
I became interested in UFOs a few years ago after seeing strange flying objects in the sky above my home town of Wakefield, West Yorkshire. I discussed my sightings with a police officer friend, and he warned me that I would not be taken seriously if I reported it to the authorities. I was astonished when he also confided in me that he had been abducted by aliens, but was too afraid to talk openly of his experience.

I decided to do some research on the issue. I talked with more abductees, attended UFO conferences, read many books on the subject and trawled the Internet for more information. I was surprised how much I found. I had no idea where my investigations would lead, but I was totally unprepared for what I uncovered.
Sifting the genuine stories from the fake accounts was challenging. Unfortunately, this subject is often trivialised and ridiculed, and I know that some will believe ALL the accounts are phony, no matter how much compelling testimony and physical evidence can be found.

I was drawn to a series of accounts that followed the same theme. Balls of light were seen in the sky, followed by abduction to a strange place, where physical examinations were made on the abductees by alien beings. Some abductees mention a breeding programme of some kind between aliens and human beings. How can so many similar stories, from individuals around the world, be false?

The idea of a book began to take shape. I wanted to expose the facts that I had discovered, but my police officer friend had warned me that nobody would listen. So I wrote a fictional account, using details from my research. You can read the serialised excerpts from the story here.
Fact or fiction?
Urban myth or government cover-up?
You decide.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This 12th excerpt is from a science fiction novel about alien abduction. If you would like to read the novel from the beginning, please see the previous excerpts in, ‘They Take our Children.’

The complete eBook series is available on Amazon stores worldwide priced at $0.99 US dollars or equivalent, or £0.99p in UK.

Please go to an Amazon online store to purchase this novel if you can’t wait to read the rest.

Amazon.com

Amazon.co.uk

 

Chapter Twelve: Terry, Courtney

Janine went back to Gavin and Helen’s home the following day, but Terry had to go to work. He found it difficult to concentrate. His job as a bus driver was not too taxing, but it did require his full attention on West Yorkshire’s busy roads. The stress was proving too much for him. After five wrong turns and a near miss at a roundabout, he decided to call in sick and go home to his wife.
Terry was a practical man. His friends would call him an ordinary bloke. He liked a pint down at the local pub, a game of darts, a good film on the television and the home comforts provided by his wife. His life would have been perfect, if only his sons were still with him. He lived with the loss and the grief of not knowing what had happened to them, every day of his life. His missing children caused a constant ache deep within him and he knew it was the same for Janine. Now Courtney was missing too. She was like the daughter they had kept trying for but never had. Janine had tests but no reason was ever found for them not conceiving after Chris. After the boys went, they stopped trying, they’d lost their children and it didn’t seem right to try to replace them with more.
Then Courtney was born, filling their lives with laughter again, easing their pain and giving them a new focus. The new baby was especially good for Janine. When Helen needed to return to work to get over the baby blues, she left the child with her. Janine was a natural mother and she bonded with Courtney, as Helen never had. Terry watched it happening, but said nothing. It would have seemed cruel to discourage his wife from becoming too attached when she so obviously thrived on motherhood.
So here they were again, feeling as they had in the first days after their sons’ disappearance. Terry clung to the hope that at least Courtney had run away and not been taken, as it was thought happened to Chris and Sam.
Terry arrived at his home in the middle of the afternoon, intending to get changed out of his work clothes before going across to Helen and Gavin’s home. He heard a chair scrape back from the table and thought Janine was in the kitchen. His mouth dropped open in surprise as he opened the door to find Courtney standing by the window, looking like a frightened kitten.
‘Courtney!’ Terry was across the kitchen in two strides, hugging his niece for all he was worth. ‘Where have you been? What did you run away for? Are you all right… ?’
‘Oh, Uncle Terry,’ Courtney sobbed, leaning into him. ‘I’m sorry, I’m so sorry for worrying you.’
They clung together, Courtney sobbing and Terry gently patting her back, soothing her. ‘Now then, love, don’t get all upset.’ He kissed the top of her head. ‘You’re back now, that’s all that matters.’ He guided her to the table where he pushed her gently onto a chair. She had let herself in as she had hundreds of times before; using the spare key they kept under a plant pot by the back gate. She looked dishevelled, but otherwise seemed well.
‘We have to let your mum and dad know that you’re safe.’ Terry moved to pick up the telephone on the kitchen wall.
‘Not yet, Uncle Terry.’ Courtney sprang from the chair, pleading with him. ‘I need some time to think, please…’ she rushed on. ‘Just an hour or two.’
‘You’ve had lots of time. They really are worried you know, love.’ Terry understood how nervous she must feel but Gavin and Helen deserved to be told. ‘How about I ring them and tell them you need a bath and something to eat and then we’ll go round?’
Courtney bit her lower lip nervously. She was obviously not looking forward to meeting her mother.
‘Your poor dad has been out of his mind.’ Terry knew that any mention of her father would encourage her to agree to a phone call. He watched as she blinked back the tears that threatened. She nodded and watched him lift the receiver.
He knew she heard the whoops of joy at the other end of the phone and she smiled her gratitude when he dissuaded the whole family from coming straight round. Instead, he asked if Janine could come home and bring some fresh clothing for Courtney.
‘Trust you, Uncle Terry, to think of the practicalities,’ she told him as he replaced the receiver.
‘Well just look at the state of you. I bet you’ve been sleeping rough!’
‘Yeah, there’s this old hut I used to play in as a kid. It’s up in the woods.’ She sniffed her arm and pulled a face. ‘I guess I really do need a change of clothes.’
‘You go on up and run a bath, I’ll get the chip pan going.’ Terry was not a great cook, but chips were a speciality of his.
‘Uncle Terry,’ Courtney went to hug him. ‘What would I do without you? A bath and your famous chips, you spoil me.’ She gave him one of her huge grins before she trudged upstairs.
Terry watched her go, grinning to himself with the relief he felt at having her back safe and sound. She didn’t seem any the worse for her nights away from home. She still had the sparkle in her eyes. He had no idea why she’d gone, but it was really none of his business and he didn’t like to pry. Janine would get to the bottom of it. She wouldn’t even need to ask. Courtney always confided in her Auntie.
Terry was busy slicing some potatoes when Janine walked in carrying a plastic carrier bag. She smiled and hugged her husband. Relief had smoothed away the worry lines that had gathered on her face, her spirits were high again.
‘Is she still in the bath?’ Janine looked to the ceiling and shouted. ‘Hey, Treasure, are you using all my hot water?’
The sound of water running away through the pipe-work mixed with Courtney’s delighted squeals, as she bumped around the bathroom. Janine and Terry exchanged a smile. They didn’t need words to express to each other how they felt.
Courtney bounded into the kitchen, still wet from her bath, with a huge towel wrapped around her. She ran straight to Janine and threw her pale thin arms round the ample waist of her Auntie.
‘Hey steady on, love, you’ll knock me off me feet.’ Janine hugged her niece fiercely.
‘It’ll take more than a seven stone weakling to move you, woman.’ Terry laughed and received a shove from his wife as Courtney giggled.
‘You sure you’re all right, love?’ Janine turned back to Courtney, concern in her eyes as she took a good look at her niece.
‘There’s nothing wrong with me that a plate full of Uncle Terry’s chips won’t put right.’ She reached over and took a piece of raw potato, popping it into her mouth and crunching.
‘You wait ’till they’re cooked.’ Terry scolded and turned to test the oil in the pan.
‘Here are your clothes, love.’ Janine gave Courtney the plastic bag. ‘Go and make yourself decent.’
After the meal, Terry left the girls to wash the dishes, knowing Courtney would open up to Janine if he weren’t there. His niece clearly needed to talk. She tried to be her normal happy-go-lucky self, but the strain of the last few days showed in the dark circles under her eyes. He went out to his greenhouse to give them some space.

Courtney was very quiet after Terry left them, but Janine kept up a steady flow of conversation, telling her how worried they’d been, how kind all the neighbours were and how everyone kept asking after her. Courtney only half listened to her Auntie, knowing she was being patient and waiting for her to speak.
Courtney had been horrified at her mother’s words and during the hours she spent alone in the woods, she almost convinced herself that she must have misheard. Maybe her mother had said something else, or maybe she was talking about someone else. But every time she re-lived the scene and she had gone over it hundreds of times, it was the same. There was no mistaking the fact that her mother had called her a monster.
What hurt Courtney most was that she had no reason to call her that. Courtney had always tried to be well behaved. She didn’t hang around street corners like some of her friends. She was always home before dark, even in winter. She got good reports from school and always helped with the chores. Courtney tried to remember if there had been anything in her behaviour that her mum could have been upset about. The only thing she could think of was that her mother was jealous of her relationship with her Auntie. Which made it even harder to talk about it with Janine.
The words had been going round for so long in her head that they sounded strange when she finally blurted them out. The very sound of her mother’s words, were unreal. ‘Mum called me a monster!’ Her pale face grew even paler and her eyes filled with tears, making them seem enormous.
‘Oh, Courtney, no!’ Janine looked shocked. ‘Your mother has certainly gone too far this time! Are you sure that’s what she said?’
‘She did, Auntie Janine, I heard her. I knew my dad had gone to see where she was. I didn’t want him to miss any more of my party so I went to get him. I heard raised voices as I got to the top of the stairs. They didn’t realise I was there, but I heard her. Then I saw her face and I knew she meant it too.’ Courtney sobbed into the waiting, soft embrace of her Aunt.
‘There now, my love, you have a good cry. We’ll get to the bottom of this.’ She held Courtney, swaying gently, letting her sob against her chest. When the worst of the crying was over and Courtney began to sniffle, Janine produced a box of tissues and led her to the kitchen table. ‘Your mum has some strange ideas and she’s not the easiest person to get along with, I should know!’ She smiled, encouraging Courtney to listen. ‘Did you know she was very ill when she was just a little younger than you are now?’
‘No, what was wrong with her?’ This was the first time Courtney had heard of her mother being ill.
‘It was very strange, even the doctors had no idea what was wrong. She just seemed to switch off, like a breakdown, you know?’ Janine paused and her eyes wouldn’t meet Courtney’s.
‘You mean she went loopy?’ Courtney looked worried.
‘Not exactly, though it seemed to be some form of mental illness.’
‘But she’s okay now isn’t she?’ Courtney wiped her red-rimmed eyes and blew her nose.
‘Yes, yes I’m sure she is, but… ’ Janine seemed stuck for words and Courtney watched as she struggled to find the right ones. ‘Well, we’ve always had to make allowances for your mum; she’s always seemed to be a bit delicate.’
‘Oh I know what you mean,’ Courtney lifted her eyes to the ceiling. ‘She’s always getting migraines; she hates hospitals, funfairs, circuses, holidays and Christmas.’ Courtney looked sad, defeated. ‘It’s not fair. She should never have had me. She hates anything to do with children and having fun. I wish you were my mum.’
Janine’s smile was lopsided. ‘I wish it too sometimes, my love. I sometimes think my sister should never have had a baby but if she hadn’t, there wouldn’t be you for us to love.’
‘Why did she have me, Janine? Was I a mistake?’ Courtney had been thinking all kinds of things while she’d been away in the woods by herself.
‘Only your mum can answer that.’ Janine touched her hand and leaned closer. ‘You’re sixteen now Courtney, almost an adult. Now you can try to have a different type of relationship with your mum. It’s true, she never did enjoy your childhood and perhaps she should have done some things better, but she did the best she could, given the person she is.’ Janine tried to explain. ‘Try to focus on the better side of Helen, the responsible side that made her do everything right by you.’
‘It still would have been better if you’d been my mum.’ Courtney sulked.
‘But you wouldn’t have had your dad then.’ Janine smiled, pointing out how much Courtney adored her father.
‘Okay, so I got a great dad, still doesn’t make up for a lousy mother.’ Courtney continued to pout, which was so out of character for her.
‘She’s not that lousy. She let me look after you. Your mum knew I could give you everything that she couldn’t.’
‘But why couldn’t she love me like you do? Why did she never try to have fun with me, play with me, or read to me like you do?’
‘I don’t know. You’ll have to ask her yourself.’ Janine squeezed Courtney’s hand. ‘All I know is that you and your mother are long overdue a good heart to heart, mother-daughter talk.’
‘I’m not sure I want to have a heart to heart with her. I’m scared! You should have seen her face.’ Courtney looked close to tears again and Janine reached out to take her other hand.
‘We’ll come with you, we’ll be there.’
‘I’m still afraid of what she’s going to say to me.’ Courtney sighed.
‘She’s still your mother, Courtney. She does love you.’ Janine sounded afraid too.
‘Does she love me?’ Courtney’s voice was filled with hope.
‘Of course, she does.’ Janine got up and moved closer to hug her niece. ‘Come on, they’ll be getting impatient to see you, let’s get Terry.’
Courtney’s mood remained sombre on the walk through the streets to her home. Terry and Janine both tried to lighten her spirits, joking about her night in the woods, calling her red riding hood, asking if she’d seen the wolf and telling her how brave she’d been. Courtney was glad of their banter, but it did little to make her feel better about the coming meeting with her parents. She knew her dad would understand. He’d heard the words himself. She even remembered him running after her but she’d hidden behind the neighbour’s hydrangea bush until he’d gone back inside. She didn’t want to talk to anybody then. She wanted to be alone with her thoughts and her fears. Now she’d had time to think things through and her mind was full of questions. Now she was ready to listen to some answers. She wanted to know why her mother had called her a monster, but she was still afraid to ask.

TO BE CONTINUED.………..

This 12th excerpt is from a science fiction novel about alien abduction. If you would like to read the novel from the beginning, please see the previous excerpts in, ‘They Take our Children.’

The complete eBook series is available on Amazon stores worldwide. Please go to an Amazon online store to purchase this novel if you can’t wait to read the rest.

Amazon.com

Amazon.co.uk

Excerpt No 11, ‘They Take our Children, Book One, The Truth Revealed.’

cover1fb

 

PROLOGUE
I became interested in UFOs a few years ago after seeing strange flying objects in the sky above my home town of Wakefield, West Yorkshire. I discussed my sightings with a police officer friend, and he warned me that I would not be taken seriously if I reported it to the authorities. I was astonished when he also confided in me that he had been abducted by aliens, but was too afraid to talk openly of his experience.

I decided to do some research on the issue. I talked with more abductees, attended UFO conferences, read many books on the subject and trawled the Internet for more information. I was surprised how much I found. I had no idea where my investigations would lead, but I was totally unprepared for what I uncovered.
Sifting the genuine stories from the fake accounts was challenging. Unfortunately, this subject is often trivialised and ridiculed, and I know that some will believe ALL the accounts are phony, no matter how much compelling testimony and physical evidence can be found.

I was drawn to a series of accounts that followed the same theme. Balls of light were seen in the sky, followed by abduction to a strange place, where physical examinations were made on the abductees by alien beings. Some abductees mention a breeding programme of some kind between aliens and human beings. How can so many similar stories, from individuals around the world, be false?

The idea of a book began to take shape. I wanted to expose the facts that I had discovered, but my police officer friend had warned me that nobody would listen. So I wrote a fictional account, using details from my research. You can read the serialised excerpts from the story here.
Fact or fiction?
Urban myth or government cover-up?
You decide.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This 11th excerpt is from a science fiction novel about alien abduction. If you would like to read the novel from the beginning, please see the previous excerpts in, ‘They Take our Children.’

The complete eBook series is available on Amazon stores worldwide priced at $0.99 US dollars or equivalent, or £0.99p in UK.

Please go to an Amazon online store to purchase this novel if you can’t wait to read the rest.

Amazon.com

Amazon.co.uk

 

Chapter Eleven: Helen

The lights danced in her bedroom, just as they had in the sky. Helen watched from her bed, fascinated by the spectacle, only a little afraid at this point. From the safe vantage point of the future, the older Helen could afford the luxury of examining her emotions. She remembered the wonder and the awe she felt as she reached out to touch the balls of light bobbing around her bed. They swayed away from her touch reminding her of magnetic experiments she’d done at school. Her hand seemed to share the same polarity as the lights. She felt the opposing force push against her hand as the balls swung away from her.

Her fingers began to tingle, then her toes and the sensation quickly spread to the rest of her body. She thought she was being electrocuted slowly and a tiny seed of fear began to grow. She remembered trying to call out at this point but her throat seemed paralysed by the strange tingles.

The lights moved towards her and she was lifted as they manoeuvred beneath her. Then they enclosed her. Her vision was filled with light and as she closed her eyes against the fierce brightness, her mouth opened in a silent scream. She remained conscious, feeling every outside influence on her body.

Somehow she had been taken out of her bedroom. The coldness of the frosty air stung her skin. The sound of the wind filled her ears as she was pushed through the night sky. Fleetingly she opened her eyes to see land and houses far below but quickly closed them tight to shut out the fearful sight. Much later she opened her eyes again in time to see a much larger ball of white light below her, growing larger as she approached it. She glanced at her body, but quickly closed her eyes in fear. Her body was not there. She had become invisible. She looked out beyond the ball of light that enclosed her. Far below there were three lakes in a line between high, steep sided hills. More, identical balls of light bobbed in the air beneath her. She remembered thinking at the time, ‘I must be dead. This is what must happen when you die.’

The present day Helen smiled as she lie in bed, death would have been easier and so much simpler.

She was rushed through, pushed into, the larger ball of white light. The light was bigger than a house, but from her vantage point, she could not tell exactly how big, even when questioned by Mr Robertshaw. She had no reference points to compare it with. Even her body was missing. The smaller ball of light surrounding Helen dissolved, leaving her suspended within the larger brightness.

She felt warmth and moistness in the air and as she felt it, the tingling sensation in her body went away. She remembered holding out her arms, watching them appear slowly and anatomically. First the bones, then the soft tissue appeared, followed by the veins and arteries and finally the skin. At this point, her fear put the block in her mind. She had always remembered up to that moment. Janine would never discuss that part. Her mind had put up a protective barrier that blocked everything from that first sighting of the lights in her bedroom. Janine continued to insist that the details she could recall were fragments of a dream. Helen thought her sister was very lucky.

Now Helen remembered everything, although the sequence of events still seemed confusing. Mr Robertshaw was always very patient with her, allowing her time to cry and time to deal with the emotions, the anger, the fear and the helplessness.

She drifted in a sea of warm, multi-coloured pastel mist. Forces pushed against her, directing her, but she felt nothing touching her physically. She was lifted and placed on a cold surface. Her nightdress had been removed, she still could not remember how.

Helen paused in her chain of thought to push the block away. She wanted to see how her clothing was taken, but the image still evaded her. Now she had to make a shift in her conscious mind, a trick taught to her by Mr Robertshaw. To see through the mental block; to force the new path in her brain and to re-connect the memories; she had to approach them from a new direction. Here she took a sideways step off the path of memory. She brought to mind the image of the lights in her bedroom and the image of herself in the bed. She made herself aware of her nightdress and the feel of it on her skin. This memory had been overwhelmed by the sense of sight, as she had been totally absorbed by the lights at the time.

Using this simple method, she could recall almost every detail of the nightmare. Over the years, whenever she found herself unable to remember some detail, she resorted to this type of self-awareness, focusing on all of her senses, not only the dominant one at the time. She didn’t consider it cheating, when it helped her pass exams. Friends were impressed by her memory skills. She didn’t explain her method, as she would have had to explain how she knew about it.

The tingling overshadowed the feel of the fabric on her skin, she forced her mind to remember the sounds and the smells, but there was only a low hissing noise and a musty, sour smell. Again her mind was defeated. She still could not recall the removal of her nightdress. She was wearing it in bed, but not when she got her body back at the end of the journey inside the larger, white ball of light.

Helen placed her mind back on the cold surface, though preparing to distance herself from the reality of what happened to the younger Helen. It was the only way she could remember and stay sane.

She felt no physical restraints, but found she couldn’t move. Her eyelids were forced open, but again, by nothing physical. She stared into a small bright violet dot of light, unable even to move her eyeball to avoid the painful glare. The light grew even brighter then it discharged a piercing needle of pain to the back of her right eye. She felt her whole body convulse with the force of her reaction to the pain, but could do nothing to protect herself from it. Then it happened again to her left eye. This time she knew what to expect and her mind screamed a silent protest as her left eye was pierced by the cruel beam of light.

She was perspiring heavily and small pools of sweat gathered beneath her. She was mortified to realise that she had also involuntarily emptied her bladder. Glowing tubular structures appeared from above; dangling suspended from some unseen ceiling, they moved stealthily and began tentatively nosing around her. They reached into the pools of sweat and urine and began to noisily suck the fluid away.

Then a soft jelly-like tube, about six inches in length and an inch or so wide, emerged from the end of one of the sucking tubes and started to slide onto her chest. It stretched then slithered, leach-like up her neck, before crawling up into her right ear. It moved gently and it tickled as it stretched, making its body thinner to probe deeper. She felt it slip inside her ear, irritating unpleasantly close to her eardrum, making her squirm with revulsion, before it backed out. Slowly it wormed across her face, making little sucking noises as it moved. Dipping into her left ear, making her mind cringe in horror, it continued its examination.

It didn’t appear to be attached to anything and seemed to have a mind of its own. It continued to explore the contours of her face, feeling like a dry slug creeping across her skin. It entered her nostril, crawling up into the sinus cavity, causing excruciating pain as it elongated and stretched down the other nostril. Then it squashed back up to fill her sinuses before starting to descend her throat. Her nose started bleeding, warm blood ran down both sides of her face and the glowing tubes appeared again to suck the blood away.

The dry slug crawled a little way down her throat, making her retch. She felt it hesitate, then it crawled on. It must have stretched as thin as a hair as it continued down, judging by the spasmodic coughing reflexes that almost choked Helen, she thought it must have gone deep into her lungs. She next felt it when it crept back up her windpipe, almost suffocating her as it reached the back of her throat, then it descended again, this time into her stomach. She could feel the progress of the invader as her insides cramped. Her mind continued to scream and her silent sobs were only evident in the tears that mingled with the blood on her face. The tubes sucked even those away, leaving her with nothing. Her chest heaved with erratic breathing, her heart hammered heavily within her chest, but she remained paralysed and helpless against the horror.

Her abdomen cramped painfully and she felt her bowels contracting. The slug crawled out, pushing ahead of it her bowel contents, which were sucked up by the noisy, gurgling, ever present, glowing tubes. Helen felt sick with embarrassment and fear, but had no time to deal with that horror. The slug continued to probe. She felt her legs forced apart and the slug crawled over her most intimate parts, wriggling its way inside her. She wet herself again as it crawled into her bladder. Feeling totally ashamed and horrified by what was happening, her body began to shake. The tubes sucked away wetness and the slug continued its progress. She felt her tummy contract in a spasm not unlike a period pain, and then felt a more intense pain and she blacked out.

She couldn’t tell how long she had been there when she came to her senses. She was aware of others nearby. She heard erratic breathing. She could smell the unmistakable odour of excrement and urine. She knew she had not been alone in her ordeal and this knowledge fortified her. Others were suffering, others would know, would understand and would help to explain to the authorities. At that point, she couldn’t wait to tell her parents, to see them take some action, so they could make it all go away. She lay on the cold hard surface and wept and hoped it was finished.

The return journey was much the same, the lights returned, bobbing around her. Again she felt the tingling then the rush of movement as her body disappeared. The lights took her home, where she woke up falling down into her bed. Thank goodness she didn’t remember at first, her young, unprepared mind would not have survived the memory.

Helen paused in her mind trip. The memory was still vivid, still horrifying after all these years. She found herself shaking, hot tears escaping her eyes. She made herself get out of bed, movement emphasising reality, putting the past and the memories firmly in their place. For now, it was over, at least for herself. She could face the past, look at it, examine it and think about it. She could not, however, talk about it. Only one person could possibly hope to understand, but Janine did not wish to share the memories. Her sister was happy to leave her mind a welcome blank.

Since the death of the only other person to know and understand, she had been alone with the nightmare. Mr Robertshaw kept in touch through the years, even tried to put her in touch with others  who had similar experiences. She went once to a meeting arranged by him, where twenty people sat around discussing spaceships, little grey men and taller cloaked figures. Some had the same experience as her, they didn’t admit to the same violations, but they shared the same memory of the misty place. She did not discuss her own ordeal, except to agree with some of the others’ statements but she listened sympathetically to some of the wilder stories.

She heard their theories about alien abductions and wondered if they were connected to her own experiences. The people she met that night seemed obsessed by space men and UFO’s. They showed each other scars, supposedly caused by minor operations performed on them by these aliens. They talked of implants, tracking devices and it was all alien to her. Nothing they talked of related to her own understanding of what happened to her. Or why it happened. She couldn’t share her deepest nightmares with these people. Not even Mr Robertshaw himself would understand completely. He didn’t know all of it.

He helped her remember, but she kept most of the memories to herself. Watching his face as she told of the horrors was almost more than she could bear. He cried with her as she told of the first night of violations. He even held her while she cried after telling of the second ordeal. But his face showed more than curiosity, more than compassion. He was obsessed and Helen only realised in later life that the man had a fixation with her experiences. All she felt at the time was that he was a bit creepy and she told herself to be wary of telling him anything more. She kept the real horror locked inside and suffered for it.

Helen needed a drink of water and quietly opened the bedroom door. A light glowed beneath Courtney’s door and for a second Helen thought her daughter had returned. Then she realised it was Gavin. She crossed the landing and looked into the bedroom. He was fast asleep, fully clothed, on top of the bed. She got the spare quilt from her own room and returned to cover him. He woke with a start, disorientated and he shook his head to clear it.

‘Sorry, darling,’ Helen sat on the edge of the bed. ‘I didn’t mean to wake you.’

‘What time is it?’ Gavin asked, automatically.

‘About five I think. I’m going to make some tea, want some?’ She stroked his red curls back from his forehead.

‘Are you okay?’ he asked, his eyes searching her own.

‘I’m fine, don’t worry.’ She forced herself to smile. It wasn’t easy to act normally when the memories were still fresh in her mind.

‘I hope Courtney’s fine too.’ Gavin sounded bitter, accusing and Helen looked away guiltily.

‘I hope so too,’ she said quietly.

‘Do you?’ Gavin sat up. ‘Do you really care?’

Helen left the bed and moved to the door. ‘More than you would know,’ she answered him as she turned to leave.

Gavin shook his head, ‘Helen?’ She looked back. ‘You are so difficult to understand sometimes, but this last twenty-four hours has been unbelievable.’

‘I know, darling.’ Helen went to sit back on the bed at his side.

‘I want to understand, Helen. Your dad showed me some weird stuff today… ’

‘Gavin, it’s late. I don’t want to wake Mum and Dad. Come have a cup of tea with me downstairs. We can talk, if you like.’ She didn’t know if she was ready to explain everything to Gavin, but if he was willing to listen to some of it, he might be able to help when the time came to tell Courtney.

‘We do need to talk, Helen. I think I need some answers.’ He took hold of her hand and Helen lowered her eyes to avoid his searching look. ‘I only wish I knew the right questions to ask.’

 

Gavin joined Helen in the kitchen. She poured him a drink from the hot teapot on the table. She had never been able to tell Gavin about his daughter. He would not have believed her if she’d tried but now she had no choice, he had to know. She was more afraid of his reaction to her memories, than the memories themselves. Her nightmares were now old friends and she could look at them without the crippling fear she once felt. They still had power over her. They still made her cry and still made her feel vulnerable, but they no longer threatened her sanity. She had learned to live with her ordeal. Now Gavin and eventually Courtney, would have to face the truth and learn somehow to live with it as she had done.

‘I know you’re full of questions Gavin and you deserve to know the answers,’ Helen began, reaching for and gripping his hand. ‘I’ll tell you everything but you might wish I hadn’t.’

‘Helen, please…’ Gavin seemed afraid and Helen realised that it must be strange for him to hear the steadiness in her voice. She knew she would appear unnaturally calm to him.

‘Why now?’ He squeezed her hand lovingly. ‘Why decide to let me into your secret, after all these years of me asking?’

‘You didn’t realise what you were asking and you didn’t ask the right questions,’ she smiled gently.

‘I still don’t know,’ he shrugged. ‘It’s a big mystery. Your dad tried to tell me this morning, sorry, yesterday morning, but it was all so far fetched. What happened to you?’

‘That’s the big question. Are you ready for the answer?’ Helen’s steady gaze never left his face.

‘Only if you’re ready to tell me,’ he said and Helen watched his Adam’s apple bob nervously in his throat.

‘You have to give me an open mind, Gavin. I couldn’t bear it if you didn’t believe me.’ She looked away, biting her lower lip.

‘I’ll believe you.’ Gavin insisted. ‘Just tell me.’

Helen took a deep breath and began. ‘It was Christmas. I was fourteen-years-old… ’ Helen told Gavin about the lights, he told her he’d seen them on the film and explained what her father had shown him.

‘Did you listen to the tapes?’ Helen asked, knowing he couldn’t have, or he would be asking different questions. Gavin shook his head and she continued her story. It was easy to tell. She’d just gone through the memory of the first night while alone in her room. She told it without emotion, right up to the part where the slug creature entered her, then she cried and Gavin held her, obviously appalled at the images she was creating in his mind.

‘This is all so horrific, my love. I want to believe you, but this is beyond belief, beyond my ken.’ He pulled her closer, gently stroking her hair. ‘The only explanation that makes any sense is the one about the night terrors.’ He held Helen as she continued to weep quietly in his arms.

Eventually, she pulled herself away from his embrace and forced herself to look into his eyes. ‘You think it was a horrible dream too, don’t you?’ she asked quietly and as he went to shake his head she smiled through her tears. ‘I didn’t expect you to believe straight away, I know how hard it is for you to understand.’

‘It’s incredible, so unreal,’ Gavin pulled her close. ‘But it was real enough to you, hen, I can see that.’

‘It wasn’t in my mind, Gavin. I know that’s what you think.’ She stayed within the circle of his arms, talking quietly into his chest. ‘I can’t alter the way you interpret what I tell you. I can only tell you.’

‘There’s more?’ he asked quietly.

‘Oh yes, Gavin, there’s much more.’ Helen leaned into him. ‘But I think it would be better to save it for another time. It’s a lot to take in.’

‘I’m ready to hear it, Helen. I need to know the whole of it.’

‘Yes you do, but Mum and Dad will be up soon and I don’t want interruptions, let’s wait for a quiet time.’

‘If that’s what you want, hen.’ He used the old familiar endearment as he pulled her closer and tried to hug away her pain.

TO BE CONTINUED…………

This 11th excerpt is from a science fiction novel about alien abduction. If you would like to read the novel from the beginning, please see the previous excerpts in, ‘They Take our Children.’

The complete eBook series is available on Amazon stores worldwide. Please go to an Amazon online store to purchase this novel if you can’t wait to read the rest.

Amazon.com

Amazon.co.uk

Excerpt No 10, ‘They Take our Children, Book One, The Truth Revealed.’

cover1fb

 

PROLOGUE
I became interested in UFOs a few years ago after seeing strange flying objects in the sky above my home town of Wakefield, West Yorkshire. I discussed my sightings with a police officer friend, and he warned me that I would not be taken seriously if I reported it to the authorities. I was astonished when he also confided in me that he had been abducted by aliens, but was too afraid to talk openly of his experience.

I decided to do some research on the issue. I talked with more abductees, attended UFO conferences, read many books on the subject and trawled the Internet for more information. I was surprised how much I found. I had no idea where my investigations would lead, but I was totally unprepared for what I uncovered.
Sifting the genuine stories from the fake accounts was challenging. Unfortunately, this subject is often trivialised and ridiculed, and I know that some will believe ALL the accounts are phony, no matter how much compelling testimony and physical evidence can be found.

I was drawn to a series of accounts that followed the same theme. Balls of light were seen in the sky, followed by abduction to a strange place, where physical examinations were made on the abductees by alien beings. Some abductees mention a breeding programme of some kind between aliens and human beings. How can so many similar stories, from individuals around the world, be false?

The idea of a book began to take shape. I wanted to expose the facts that I had discovered, but my police officer friend had warned me that nobody would listen. So I wrote a fictional account, using details from my research. You can read the serialised excerpts from the story here.
Fact or fiction?
Urban myth or government cover-up?
You decide.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This 10th excerpt is from a science fiction novel about alien abduction. If you would like to read the novel from the beginning, please see the previous excerpts in, ‘They Take our Children.’

The complete eBook series is available on Amazon stores worldwide priced at $0.99 US dollars or equivalent, or £0.99p in UK.

Please go to an Amazon online store to purchase this novel if you can’t wait to read the rest.

Amazon.com

Amazon.co.uk

 

Chapter Ten: Gavin, Helen

 

Gavin was fascinated, but he’d been with his father-in-law all morning at the old man’s house and time was getting on. They were no nearer finding Courtney and he was getting more concerned about Helen. The more he read about the first episode of her illness, the more he worried about her present state of health. Gavin was impatient to be with his wife, to find his daughter and saw George’s plan to sift further through the contents of the old suitcase, as a waste of time.

‘This is all well and good, George,’ he shuffled some papers together. ‘But I can’t see where we’re going with it.’

‘There’s a lot to take in, son,’ George agreed. ‘Maybe we should call it a day and see how Mary’s doing with our Helen.’

George gathered the scattered contents of the suitcase, carefully placing them in the correct files. He retrieved the discs from the DVD player and placed them on top of the pile before closing the lid.

‘Here, I’ll take it back upstairs for you,’ Gavin offered, reaching for the handle.

‘No, lad, leave it be,’ George told him. ‘We’ll come back later when you’re ready.’

Gavin couldn’t imagine that he would ever be ready to read through the whole suitcase full of files that the old man had collected, but smiled, to humour him. Gavin had more important things on his mind.

The two men set out in the pouring rain to Gavin and Helen’s home. Only a few people were about. Some asked if Courtney was home yet. It was a close-knit neighbourhood and everyone seemed concerned about the missing teenager. Gavin shook his head at them, not wanting to enter into conversation, being impatient to get home. He wanted to see if Janine and Terry had left, wanted to believe they would find Courtney waiting for them at their house. He wanted to see Helen, to look into her eyes and not see the vacant stare he’d seen there a few hours before. He wanted everything to be all right, he wanted everything to be back to normal, but somehow he knew that he was asking too much.

Gavin realised that what he had glimpsed in George’s suitcase was the tip of the iceberg. Clearly, there was a much deeper mystery surrounding Helen’s past, but he was equally clear in his own mind that it would have nothing to do with flying saucers or little green men. He was not the kind of person to be interested in anything other than plain facts and substantial hard evidence. He told himself that all George had, was a mountain of paper documentation about coincidences, strange sightings and possible mass hysteria brought about by the media coverage. Nothing else that he read in the documents had suggested a link with Helen and the other girls who became ill. He’d known about mass hysteria, he could understand the causes and the effects. He could not understand paranormal investigators, found it difficult to deal with what George described and tried to put it out of his mind. Gavin preferred to think in terms that he could understand. Labelling Helen’s illness as hysteria suited his rational mind and gave him something normal to cling to.

The house was quiet as they let themselves in. An appetising aroma of bacon grilling, reminded them how hungry they were. Mary was in the kitchen and she reached into the fridge to get more bacon when she saw them come in.

‘Where’s Helen?’ Gavin asked, moving to the stairs.

‘Leave her to sleep, the doctor gave her a sedative, she’ll be out for a couple more hours yet.’ Mary fussed with the grill, arranging the slices of bacon on the wire rack.

‘Did he say she’d be all right?’ George asked, getting the kettle and filling it from the tap.

‘He said it was to be expected. Stress and all that, with our Courtney running off, you know.’ She looked at Gavin’s worried expression. ‘She’ll be fine after a few hours’ sleep, you’ll see.’ She tried to reassure him.

‘I’ve just shown him those medical reports, so that’s why he’s a bit concerned.’ George told her, sheepishly.

‘That blasted suitcase full of junk!’ Mary turned on him. ‘No wonder he looks so scared!’ She laid a hand on Gavin’s arm. ‘Now you take no notice of his little fixation, it’s all in the past.’ She moved back to the cooker. ‘No good will come of raking over cold ashes. You mark my word! What’s done is done and can’t be undone and there’s no need bringing it all up again. What’s happened with our Courtney is nothing to do with all that nonsense.’ She banged about, setting the table with plates and bread and cutlery as she ranted and the two men stood back watching her display of temper.

‘Don’t be too sure, Mary,’ George said quietly when she’d calmed. ‘It might have everything to do with what happened back then, just as the disappearance of our Sam and Chris did, but you wouldn’t listen that time either, would you?’ He sat at the table and watched his wife bang down the plate full of sliced bread.

‘Don’t you dare start all that again,’ Mary whispered harshly. ‘Our Janine and Terry are in the living room, I don’t want you bringing up all that nonsense again.’

‘It’s not nonsense!’ George spoke through clenched teeth, but lowered his tone as he continued. ‘Our Janine knows the truth, she just won’t face it.’ George poured out two mugs of tea from the pot Mary placed on the table. ‘I can’t blame her for sticking her head in the sand, though.’

Gavin watched the two sparring partners, wondering at their words. He understood only half what they were talking about, but the small hairs at the back of his neck began to prickle. He knew with a kind of sixth sense that he was at the beginning of a roller-coaster ride. One that had started with the opening of the suitcase and he knew he would have to ride it out if he wanted to get to the bottom of Helen’s secret. ‘How could the disappearance of Sam and Chris have anything to do with this?’ Gavin asked, careful to keep his voice low.

‘Now look what you’ve done!’ Mary hissed. ‘Don’t you start, Gavin, it’s bad enough having one nutcase in the family and I don’t mean our Helen!’ She gave a knowing look at her husband.

‘You didn’t complain when I brought in that Mr Robertshaw and you have to admit he did the trick.’ George hissed back at her.

‘Trick! Well that was the right word. He was nothing more than a conjurer, a stage hypnotist.’ Mary stuck out her chin defying George to argue with her.

‘That was the way he earned a living I grant you,’ George nodded agreement, ‘but he didn’t ask for a penny from us did he?’ He challenged her.

‘Wouldn’t have got it if he had! All that mumbo jumbo,’ she shook her head, her nose in the air. ‘Couldn’t understand a word! Then there was all that secrecy! We would have had no idea what went on in those sessions if he hadn’t passed away and left you those tapes.’ She sniffed. ‘Not that there was anything on them to understand, they were full of the same mumbo jumbo. Honestly, that child’s imagination.’

‘It was not imagination, woman, it was real enough to her.’ George insisted.

‘It was him putting ideas into her head, that’s what it was.’

‘Hey, you two,’ Gavin had heard enough of their sniping. ‘Whatever he said or did, Helen did get well. Does it matter who is right or wrong?’ he asked them.

‘I’m just saying it’s the wrong time to bring all that palaver up again.’ Mary shrugged.

‘And I’m saying it is time to look at it again, for our Courtney’s sake.’ George was not giving in.

‘Well maybe we should wait until she’s back safe and sound before we get into this any deeper.’ Gavin suggested, not really wanting to hear their opinions, but curious now to learn more from the contents of the suitcase, especially as George seemed to think Courtney was involved.

 *

Terry took Janine home sometime in the afternoon, promising to call if they heard anything from Courtney. Mary and George stayed with Gavin, keeping him company in his lonely vigil. Helen slept on, obviously finding escape in her drugged slumber. They took turns through the evening to check on her and to make sure she slept comfortably. Every time the telephone rang all three jumped to answer it. Every time, it was a concerned friend asking for news.

Helen’s parents tried to persuade Gavin to get some sleep, but he could only doze in the chair. George and Mary huddled on the sofa, holding hands. For all their harsh words, they remained close, comforting each other through another long night of stress. Together they waited for the telephone to ring, or for the knock on the door. All three dozed intermittently and talked quietly in their wakeful moments. They retired to bed in the early hours, deciding that if Helen was going to sleep until morning, they should try to get some rest too.

 *

Helen woke as the others went quietly to their beds. She heard George and Mary moving around in the spare room and Gavin whispered a quiet, ‘goodnight,’ to them as he closed the door to Courtney’s room. She lay still, grateful for the peace and quiet of the large empty bed. Her sleep had been dreamless and she felt refreshed, though not inclined to get up. Her mind was too full and she needed time to sort through her emotions. She let her thoughts drift, from Courtney to Gavin, to her parents, to Janine and back to Courtney.

She would never forgive herself. Courtney should not have heard what she called her. It was not the child’s fault. Helen knew she should have been more careful all those years ago. Then Courtney would never have been born. Just as Sam and Chris should never have been born.

Helen lie in the quiet, peaceful darkness and allowed herself to remember. She could only do this because of one man. Mr Robertshaw persuaded her all those years ago, that she could think about her ordeal. Thinking about it would not make it happen again, talking about it would not make it happen again. She knew it would happen again, though. Maybe not to her or Janine, but it would happen to others. Many more girls and boys would know the fear, and feel the pain and try to block it out. Most would come through it unscathed, just as Janine thought she had done, but then in future years it would come back when they least expected it. Come back to take their precious children.

Had Courtney been taken? She shuddered under the quilt thinking of her child, the child she gave birth to, being with them. She knew Courtney didn’t really belong to her. She was not flesh of her flesh, at least not in the real sense of the words. She was Gavin’s though and that made a difference. She tried to love the daughter of her husband, she was an easy child to love, but every time she looked into her eyes she saw her own fear, her own pain and the gap between them widened.

Gavin did not understand. He could not be expected to understand. He believed there was nothing wrong with the child. He even deluded himself that she looked like her mother and couldn’t understand why Helen found that amusing. She smiled in the darkness of her bedroom. Didn’t any of them see how different she was? With Gavin’s red curls and hazel eyes, her own dark complexion, dark hair and brown eyes, how did they manage to produce a child so fair? She was almost albino white, her skin nearly transparent, with platinum blond hair. Courtney’s eyes were the palest blue, almost colourless. The midwife feared the baby was blind, she’d never seen eyes so pale in a newborn before. The family joked about fairy changeling blood in their gene banks, especially since Sam and Chris had been born with the same delicate looks. Helen stopped trying to make them see. Of course, the children looked different, they were different.

Helen forced herself to remember. She needed to know if she did still remember. She owed it to Courtney to try to explain, if her daughter ever returned home. Courtney needed to know where she came from and would need to be prepared. Sam and Chris had no idea and she shuddered as she thought about how frightened the little boys would have been. She wondered where they were now and what kind of lives they were living. She knew they lived. She also knew that Janine believed they were alive. Helen tried to speak with her sister soon after the boys went missing and again just before Courtney was born. Janine would not discus any possibility other than the police theories. They could have been murdered, or offered for sale to childless couples, or kidnapped for some devious perverted reason. Janine believed some misguided people trafficking in the lucrative business of overseas adoption had taken them. It came close to the truth, but Janine refused point blank to listen to Helen’s version.

When Helen first became pregnant at thirty-three-years old, she went into denial, not even going to see the doctor until her fifth month. She was devastated, after avoiding pregnancy for so long, she had to face the reality of what happened to her when she was fourteen-years-old and she almost couldn’t bear it. Gavin’s enthusiasm carried her through the pregnancy. He was ecstatic and couldn’t wait for the child to be born. His excitement was contagious and she even found herself hoping for a little boy with red curly hair and a cheeky grin. She knew it would never happen though, and in her more sober moods, she faced the truth. Her child, Gavin’s child, would be born at exactly nine months, would have perfect features, perfect skin, perfect white hair and the palest blue eyes full of wisdom, ages old.

Helen continued to work in the small primary school just outside Edinburgh. She loved her work. The children she taught had filled a void in her and she was more than a little apprehensive at leaving them. The void was soon to be filled by a child of her own. Like it or not, Helen had to face the fact that she was going to be responsible for the child in her womb. She would have to face the knowledge every day that the child was only on loan to her. She knew beyond a shadow of doubt that, they, would be back to reclaim what was theirs.

They moved back to Yorkshire a few weeks before the birth. Gavin had been offered a post at the University in Leeds and it seemed a good time for Helen to return to her roots and her family. Helen’s parents were overjoyed. They fussed over their daughter and helped decorate the small semidetached house the couple bought just round the corner from their home in Wakefield, insisting Helen did nothing. Even Janine and Terry helped, though it must have been difficult for them with Helen so close to having a child. It had been only a year and a half since their two boys were taken. Janine put on a sunny smile for Helen. She seemed to be genuinely looking forward to the birth.

The labour, when it came, was long and hard and as she struggled to bring the child into the world, Helen screamed, kicked out and thrashed on the labour bed. The midwife threatened to sedate her, appalled at her behaviour. Helen refused to let Gavin anywhere near and he had to be content to stand in a corner of the room. She didn’t know what her reaction would be when she saw the baby. She was frightened she would hate it on sight and hoped to hide that hate from her husband. She was unprepared for the rush of emotion as the midwife placed the pale child in her arms at the end of her struggle.

Courtney, wrapped in a green hospital sheet, still wet from the birth fluids, was very quiet. Her mouth made little suckling movements, her eyes remained tight closed. The soft down on her head was sticky and dark with blood and she was the most beautiful baby. Tears sprang to Helen’s eyes as the wealth of love overwhelmed her. Far from hating this baby, Helen adored her and felt fiercely protective of her. Even when the baby opened her eyes and gazed at Helen with those knowing pale-blue irises, Helen smiled into those eyes with tears of devotion trickling down her cheeks.

When Gavin was finally allowed to greet his daughter, the look on his face was full of wonder. He told Helen much later that he would never forget the look on her face. He told her that she had never been more beautiful than she was that day. Her face full of love as it gazed down at their child.

The first few weeks were difficult, quite apart from the sleepless nights and the unfamiliar routine of feeds and changes, Helen struggled most with her emotions. There was no denying she loved the baby, but she feared every minute of the day, that her love was wasted. She knew Courtney was only on loan to her, though Gavin had no idea, she couldn’t bring herself to tell him. Gavin was the kind of man who laughed at anything supernatural, anything that could not be borne out by hard evidence, so she knew he would treat her story with scorn. She knew that he would listen politely, just as her mother and father had when Mr Robertshaw helped her explain to them. Then Gavin would have told her not to be so dramatic and would insist that there was a reasonable explanation for most things and he would set about finding one. The nightmares of her youth would remain just that to Gavin, simply bad dreams. She wished they could be so simply explained, so simply true.

Her father had been shocked, her mother tut-tutted and remained tight-lipped throughout the difficult explanations. When Mr Robertshaw left soon after, her mother launched into a tirade of verbal abuse, aimed mainly at her father for bringing such a man into the house. Needless to say, Helen knew her mother didn’t believe a word of her story and tried to rationalise it by saying the man had put words into Helen’s mouth, dramatising the nightmares she had suffered, by trying to give them some credence of being real. Her father had stayed quiet, glancing at Helen, his face an impenetrable mask. Helen could not tell whether he believed her, and felt abandoned. Mr Robertshaw had prepared her for their rejection of the truth, explaining that her parents would find her story hard to believe. She had thought she was ready to tell them, but she wished with all her heart she had kept quiet.

She could still see the look on their faces as she described the horrors, helped by Mr Robertshaw when she reached a difficult part. She didn’t want to see that same look on Gavin’s face. She didn’t want his pity and his scorn. She didn’t want to look into his face and see doubt, fear and rejection. She loved her husband, he was the rock in the stormy, troubled waters of her life and she knew she would not survive without his complete love and belief in her. So she kept the terrible secret of Courtney’s destiny and paid dearly for shouldering the burden alone.

Looking back she could see how the rest of the family tried to help her. Her mother said she must have been suffering baby blues. Janine suggested she go back to work, offering to look after Courtney for them. Helen grasped this lifeline. She needed to escape from the reality that smothered her. She soon found a position in a local primary school and life moved on.

Helen continued to care for her child, making sure she wanted for nothing. She fed and cleaned her, saw to her needs, but Gavin showered the child with the love and affection she needed more. Helen did love her, more each day as she grew up, but was afraid of where that love would lead her. Helen could see her own future pain, in the haunted eyes of her sister. She never wanted to feel the pain her sister felt. She didn’t want to feel the aching void left by the disappearance of her child, so she distanced herself from the love she felt. She drew a veil over the feelings that enveloped her when she looked at her uncannily beautiful child. Helen saw that Courtney found in others what she could not find in her own mother. Gavin doted on her, Janine and Terry spoilt her and both her grandparents idolised her. Helen withdrew from Courtney in the mistaken belief that she was protecting herself from further harm.

Now Courtney was gone and Helen felt the pain more keenly because it had been tempered by guilt. The guilt of knowing she should have shown her feelings more. She should have seen Courtney for what she was, a beautiful, talented girl and not what she believed her to be. Now Courtney knew exactly what Helen thought. Hot tears of remorse ran down Helen’s cheeks as she remembered the stricken look on her daughter’s face. She promised herself that if, or when, Courtney returned, she would tell her the whole truth. First she would tell her how sorry she was, how bitterly she regretted her treatment of Courtney, but mostly she would tell her how much she loved her. Then she would try to explain. The child should know. It was time she was told. Helen tried to remember. She wanted to put the whole story into words that her child could understand.

Clearing her mind as Mr Robertshaw had taught her, Helen focused on the inside of her own eyelids, concentrating on the shifting patterns there, letting her mind empty of the thoughts concerning Courtney, Gavin, her parents and her sister. Gradually, she swept them all to the far reaches of her consciousness. When she was satisfied that her mind was receptive, she took herself back to the Christmas when the nightmare began. Breathing steadily, controlling every breath, she allowed herself to remember.

TO BE CONTINUED…………

This 10th excerpt is from a science fiction novel about alien abduction. If you would like to read the novel from the beginning, please see the previous excerpts in, ‘They Take our Children.’

The complete eBook series is available on Amazon stores worldwide. Please go to an Amazon online store to purchase this novel if you can’t wait to read the rest.

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Excerpt No 9, ‘They Take our Children, Book One, The Truth Revealed.’

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PROLOGUE
I became interested in UFOs a few years ago after seeing strange flying objects in the sky above my home town of Wakefield, West Yorkshire. I discussed my sightings with a police officer friend, and he warned me that I would not be taken seriously if I reported it to the authorities. I was astonished when he also confided in me that he had been abducted by aliens, but was too afraid to talk openly of his experience.

I decided to do some research on the issue. I talked with more abductees, attended UFO conferences, read many books on the subject and trawled the Internet for more information. I was surprised how much I found. I had no idea where my investigations would lead, but I was totally unprepared for what I uncovered.
Sifting the genuine stories from the fake accounts was challenging. Unfortunately, this subject is often trivialised and ridiculed, and I know that some will believe ALL the accounts are phony, no matter how much compelling testimony and physical evidence can be found.

I was drawn to a series of accounts that followed the same theme. Balls of light were seen in the sky, followed by abduction to a strange place, where physical examinations were made on the abductees by alien beings. Some abductees mention a breeding programme of some kind between aliens and human beings. How can so many similar stories, from individuals around the world, be false?

The idea of a book began to take shape. I wanted to expose the facts that I had discovered, but my police officer friend had warned me that nobody would listen. So I wrote a fictional account, using details from my research. You can read excerpts from the the story here.
Fact or fiction?
Urban myth or government cover-up?
You decide.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This 9th excerpt is from a science fiction novel about alien abduction. If you would like to read the novel from the beginning, please see the previous excerpts in, ‘They Take our Children.’

The complete eBook series is available on Amazon stores worldwide.

Please go to an Amazon online store to purchase this novel if you can’t wait to read the rest.

 

Chapter Nine: (In the past, Helen)

Helen had floated in the mist. She didn’t feel uncomfortable, being neither hot nor cold, nor wet, nor dry. Surrounded by vapour, she was suspended in time, beyond all sensation of physical self. She was only slightly aware on a mental level, of her surroundings. She felt pangs of anxiety. Quivers of unease tickled her mind. Smoky blurred images of a past life intruded occasionally, tugging at her, trying to prise her from her secluded tranquillity. She resisted, preferring the calm sea of mist, preferring the comfort of this non-world to the frightening reality she was dimly aware of that existed beyond the veil.
She was aware of others that occupied the place she drifted in. Other unsettled souls vibrated with her in the mist. She felt their presence and was comforted by them, not knowing who they were, but feeling them to be kindred spirits. They jostled together, instinctively aware of each other. Sometimes they sought each other out, minds mingling, clinging supportively to each other. Mostly they drifted alone, aimless, adrift in the mist.
None of them remembered who they were. Helen only knew what she was now, an amorphous being, without solid form, mingling with others of her kind. They existed in a reality that had nothing to do with the other world, the world they caught glimpses of on the edges of the mist. They were remnants, discarded pieces of unwanted and unneeded beings. They were surplus to the requirements of the ones who took them, at least for the moment.
Helen had been shown glimpses of their purpose, a small insight that did nothing to lessen her fear, or her confusion. The other souls sharing her existence also knew. They shared and meshed their emotions constantly. The strange beings that controlled their lives had plans. Great schemes were in motion, which would alter all their futures and the future of hundreds of others who did not share in the privilege of knowing. It was a future that would begin somewhere out of the mist, beyond the safety of the vapour in which they drifted.
The fragmented images from other minds sometimes mixed with Helen’s own mental pictures. A confusion of memories filled her mind. She shared the recollections of fractured lives, and of happier times. No words could be spoken without mouths. There were no faces to be recognised, none to be seen without eyes. It was not in a physical way that they came to know each other, but instinctively, intuitively. The group became aware of each other in the most intimate of ways and they knew the minds of their fellow prisoners, the very essence of them. They became one being, one entity in the haze.
The blurred images and faint mutterings from Helen’s past life were at first, a nuisance and an annoying intrusion into her sanctum. She ignored them, pushing away the tendrils of reality that reached out to her through the veil. Gradually, the images became clear and the mutters became intelligible words. Their persistence was compelling and eventually she found she could no longer ignore them. Gradually, she began to respond. She learned that the intrusion would go away sooner after a small acknowledgement from her, leaving her to wander the mist in peace with her friends, her allies.
The others were also having trouble with intrusions from their previous lives and the mist became a cacophony of unintelligible babble, as these past lives determinedly clawed back their own. One by one, the souls in the mist left. With each departure, the level of confusion dropped, as the babbling lessened, but the feeling of isolation among the survivors grew as their numbers fell.
Helen felt the pull of her family constantly. Eventually, it became a strain she grew tired of fighting against. She wanted to return, especially as the comforting presence of the others diminished continually. Only her fear kept her firmly in the mist for longer. She knew that once she returned, they would claim her and her life would continue on the path that had been marked for her. Once she set foot on the path, her future was sealed. Heartbreak lay ahead if she allowed that to happen.
She finally discovered an inner strength that sanctioned her to think independently. She made a decision. She decided not to allow the great plan to affect her and deciding made her stronger. She had choices and she would make them. The first choice she made was to leave the misty place. Resigning herself to fate, she listened to the calling of her family.
She ventured towards them, reaching out of the mist, feeling herself grow weary and heavy, struggling to form words from a consciousness devoid of language. She was repeatedly forced away from the family who pulled at her. She made the effort to escape the fog many times, but each time she was pulled back to the enveloping mist, to rejoin her decreasing number of comrades.
Then a strange voice reached out to her, one that she found irresistible. It trickled through her senses, undermining her fear, filling her with strength and hope. It wove into her consciousness, tied anchoring knots to her soul and began to pull. The voice called out to her, tugging gently, bringing her back. She allowed herself to be brought out of the mist. Leaving its cloying security made her fearful, but the voice compelled her to keep moving forward.
Helen looked out at her parents, wondering how she got home. They were so pleased to see her, fussing and touching her. She tried to speak, but only jumbled sounds came out, her thoughts were fragmented.
The strange man introduced himself as Mr Robertshaw. His was the voice that brought her home. She stared at him, an odd-looking man with a deep intensity to his eyes. He saw into her soul, he knew where she had been. She knew he knew. Her parents still fussed, they were unaware of this man’s intrusion of her soul. They were oblivious of the creeping unease Helen felt in his presence.
She barely understood the noise they made. The buzz of conversation sounded alien to her ears, it was loud and painful, but some deep recess of her mind recognised the words. She was unable to speak coherently. The meanings of her thoughts got lost between brain and spoken word. She allowed the fussing, but shrank from the invasive attentions of Mr Robertshaw. She was relieved when he spoke to her parents, telling them she would need quiet and rest. Her relief was short-lived as she heard him making arrangements with her father to return.

Strange as the place was where she had been, it felt even stranger to be home. She was pathetically weak and it was an effort to stand. Walking was a disorientating experience, as her limbs felt like encumbrances. Her head was a heavy load to carry. Eating was a joy, the taste and textures of food a delight. She felt her body taking in the nutrition and growing stronger daily. Words came gradually. She listened to her family speaking, taking in the rhythm and feel of the sounds. The sounds they made connected to her thoughts, becoming meaningful at last. She could speak, but she couldn’t find words to explain what she’d lived through. They didn’t ask too many questions. Helen was grateful because she didn’t have answers, only more questions and she knew they couldn’t answer them for her.
When Mr Robertshaw returned, a few days later, Helen felt stronger and more in control of her senses, or so she thought.
He set up his recording machine on the low coffee table, much to the interest of her mother. He asked for complete privacy and Helen watched with dismay as her mother left them alone. She gave herself a mental shake, this was only a man, he had no power to hurt her, she only had to call out and her mother would come to her aid immediately. She took a deep steadying breath. This was not so bad, he only wanted to talk, like the doctors and counsellors yesterday and the day before. They all had questions for her, but she had no answers. She kept repeating, ‘I’m fine,’ ‘I’m okay,’ hoping they would be satisfied and leave her alone.
When Mr Robertshaw began to speak, his voice was like liquid, flowing through her consciousness. She tried to resist the heaviness that crept over her, but was helpless, as she felt her very thoughts being manipulated.
His words forged pathways through her clouded, fragmented memory and forced her to look in the dark shadows of her mind. His penetrating, mellifluous voice lifted the veils of security, revealing the awful truth buried deep in her brain. The pictures crowded her head, filling her with horror and revulsion. The bile rose in her throat, gagging her as she realised the full extent of her experience.
When the contents of her stomach emptied onto Mr Robertshaw’s scuffed black shoes, he stopped talking. Instead, he stared, open-mouthed at her reaction to the memories he had made her look at. Helen stared back, breathing heavily, wiping the traces of vomit from her mouth with the back of her trembling hand.
Mary came rushing in when she heard the explosive sound, concern for her daughter and disapproval of Mr Robertshaw clear on her scowling face. After making sure Helen was none the worse for being sick, she went to get a bucket and cloth and began to clear up the mess, tut-tutting at the man and making it abundantly clear that in her opinion, he was not to be trusted. ‘It’s all very well for George to invite you to our home, Mr Robertshaw, but I don’t like leaving you alone with Helen and just see what it has led to!’
‘Mrs Andrews, I must apologise for not informing you of the consequences of the first few regressions.’ Mr Robertshaw watched Helen’s mother as she mopped up the mess. ‘You must understand, your daughter has some particularly unpleasant memories to expose.’ His intense gaze never left Helen’s face.
‘What memories? She’s never left the house for months, the only thing we need to know is that she’s going to be all right from now on.’ Mary wrung out the cleaning cloth fiercely, in the bucket of disinfectant. Getting to her feet, she lifted the bucket, stretched to her full height of five foot four and turned to face the diminutive man. ‘All this palaver! Huh! The doctor is very pleased with her progress, I don’t want to sound ungrateful, but I can’t see what good you’re doing, coming here and making her sick like this!’
‘I do understand how you feel, Mrs Andrews.’ His voice became fluid, placating, almost wheedling. ‘Helen does seem well, physically,’ he emphasised, ‘but you must understand, those night terrors were pretty spectacular, eh, Helen?’ He looked for support to the frightened girl, who stared back at him with eyes like saucers, too shocked by her recent excursion into her subconscious to reply.
‘Well all I can see is a frightened girl who doesn’t need all this hocus-pocus.’ Mary leaned to put a reassuring hand on the girl’s shoulder.
‘All this ‘hocus-pocus’ as you call it, will cleanse your daughter’s mind, Mrs Andrews,’ his silky tones wove their spell, ‘please allow me to continue, she will benefit, believe me.’
Mary seemed to hesitate, clearly unwilling to leave Helen in the same room as this man.
‘I’ll be okay now, Mum.’ Helen found her voice. She had heard the words, cleanse her mind and hoped Mr Robertshaw meant them literally. If he could rid her of the awful pictures that she knew were real, despite his words, night terrors, it would be worth a few more emptied stomachs. ‘You’d better leave the bucket though,’ she said to her mother as an afterthought.
Mary huffed, sighed and relented, setting the bucket by Helen’s side.
‘I’m right next door if you need me.’ She looked directly at Helen, searching her face for signs of distress.
‘I’m fine, Mum, honest.’ Helen managed a weak smile that worked wonders on her mother.
Alone again with this ferret of a man, Helen steeled herself against his insidious voice.
‘Relax, Helen,’ he smiled at her, showing uneven, tobacco stained teeth. ‘This won’t work unless you let me help you.’
‘What are you going to do?’ She was more than apprehensive, this time she knew where his voice could take her.
‘What you saw in your mind, what you remembered, is real. It happened to you and you have to live with it.’
‘No! You’re wrong!’ She didn’t want to listen and put her hands over her ears, childishly. ‘It was a nightmare,’ she insisted.
‘That would be too easy, Helen.’ He kept his voice low, soothing and oily. ‘You know different, you know how real it was.’ He leaned to the tape recorder and switched it back on. ‘Listen to me, listen to my voice and concentrate only on my words… ’
Helen closed her eyes, trying to shut out the droning, impelling noise, but felt herself relax despite her opposition. This time she was wary, she knew what lay beyond the shadows and approached them carefully as the voice led her back into the mist.

To be continued……………………
If you can’t wait to read the rest, They Take our Children, Book one, The Truth Revealed and They Take our children, Book Two, Taking Control, are now available as kindle eBooks in all Amazon stores.

Thank you for taking an interest in my work.